Sous-Vide-Que Ribs Re-Engineered!

Part 2

In our last post (CVap Sous Vide Barbecue, Sort Of!) we showed you how to use our CVap® Smoker to make great barbecued baby back ribs two ways: under vacuum (sous vide style) and bagless (sous vide re-engineered). We were inspired by our friends at Amazing Ribs. They recommend a method for St. Louis Cut Sous-Vide-Que  that was inspired by Kenji Lopez-Alt at Serious Eats. We decided to try that method next. Check out our process below and you might get a little Kentucky Fried surprise at the end! 

Ingredients

Procedure

  1. Remove membrane from ribs and rinse.
  2. Cut each rack in half (full slab will not fit in vacuum bag)
  3. Rub mayonnaise on all sides of the ribs.
  4. Liberally sprinkle Memphis Dust on all sides of ribs.
  5. Weigh each ½ slab of ribs.
  6. Vacuum seal each ½ slab of ribs in vacuum sealer, using high temp bags.
  7. Allow ribs to rest in refrigerator for a minimum of six hours.
  8. Preheat CVap RTV5-05UV to 150°F water temperature and sous-vide setting for air temperature.
  9. Place prepared ribs into oven and cook the ribs for 18 hours.
  10. Remove ribs and weigh for yield.
  11. If preferred, place on grill and crisp, then finish with another dusting of Memphis Dust.
After slathering with mayo, dust with rub seasonings.
Bagged ribs ready for the oven.
Cooked ribs, still in bags, removed from the oven.
Finishing on the grill.

Some may question why cook ribs for 18 hours? There are multiple answers.

  • Consistency
  • Controlled quality time in and time out
  • All the labor up front
  • Allows you to produce ribs in non-peak operating hours
  • Perfect ribs may be removed from the bag and finished on the grill and served to your customer in minutes, not hours
  • Shelf life of ribs are extended, and only have to be finished when your customer orders them. Makes inventory management a breeze and reduces food waste.

The beauty of fabricating St. Louis ribs is that you get the beautiful byproducts of short ribs and rib tips. Guess what – we sous vide those too! But we weren’t done with them yet! Since we are the inventors of the best pressure fryer in the business, we thought it would be neat to bread and fry our short ribs and ribs tips. We took one of our favorite coatings and breaded the sous vide rib tips and short ribs, then fried them in our Collectramatic for three minutes at 330°F. Talk about tasty! Tender juicy rib meat with crispy tasty texture! YUM! A Kentucky fried surprise!

Who says fryers are just for chicken?
Safety first – always!

Our Reputation is at Steak!

Serve A Perfect Steak Every Time – Only with CVap® Staging.

Steak Strips

Perfectly seared steak in less than two minutes flat! Yep, I said it. Seared to perfection, and melt-in-your-mouth texture, all from CVap® Staging. How do we do it? Start with a CVap Cook & Hold Oven. Cook the steak to a perfect 130°F and just let it hang out in the CVap oven. The amazing part of the process is when the steak reaches temperature, the oven won’t overcook the steak. During the busy service rush in your restaurant, don’t worry about checking the CVap Oven. The oven does the work and the steaks won’t overcook. CVap Technology will hold to perfection. Think of it as sous vide re-engineered. It’s similar to immersion circulators, with one added advantage; volume. CVap can cook a large volume of food – up to ten hotel pans in our smaller CVap ovens.

Set the CVap Cook and Hold at 130°F vapor, 131°F air. Cook Time will depend on the type of steak and the amount of steak you are cooking.

Marinate steak with your favorite marinade. I’m loving chimichurri sauce right now. Vacuum seal the steak. Place in preheated CVap oven and press start. Then walk away! Once the cycle finishes, pull steaks as needed for orders.

Heat your grill pan on high heat for ten minutes. Pat steaks dry on both sides. Season with Himalayan salt and fresh cracked black pepper.

Sear steak on each side for 30 to 45 seconds. Pull off and let rest. Slice and serve.

Want to watch a quick, quirky video about CVap® Staging? Click here.

Share your CVap story

We don’t like to toot our own horn. But we LOVE it when other folks toot it for us! If CVap makes a difference for you, we want to hear about it!

We’d love for you to come share your stories with us at ANC in St. Louis.

Fill out the form below and someone will contact with you shortly!







 

Why Meet Us in St. Louis?

Party 'til you can bearly stand it!

We know there are hundreds of organizations exhibiting at ANC 2019. So why should you take the time to meet us?

  • Have a blast with us as we celebrate Winston’s 50th Birthday!
  • Learn what’s new with CVap® equipment
  • Meet the Combi Crusher! Learn how CVap Retherm Ovens give you combi-oven performance at a fraction of the cost!

Need more reasons to visit booth 1281?

  • Register to Win a New CVap for your school!
  • Register to Win a paid registration to ANC 2020 in Nashville!
  • Win an ultra-cool and highly-coveted Winston shirt!

We think CVap equipment is pretty darned awesome. But we’re a little biased. So listen to what some of your peers had to say.

Want to give your own CVap story? We’d love to talk to you!

See Winston at booth 1281!

meet ME in St. Louis

Combi Ovens; Blessing or Boondoggle?

Ah, the much celebrated, occasionally maligned combi-oven. Many a chef has salivated over the thought of adding a combi to their kitchen. But are they all they’re cracked up to be?

Combi ovens allow the user to steam bake, roast, and do a combination of these processes (hence the name combi). Some ovens allow very intricate setting capabilities, perhaps even being controlled by touching a picture of food. They cook fast, and honestly do a good job overall. That being said, those who are familiar with combi units also know that most of these units are very complicated to develop setting for and are almost always underutilized by the customer.

In comparison, CVap ovens also allow you to steam, bake, roast, and do a combination of these processes. They do not have the same kilowatts as the combi, so they are not going to cook quite as fast. But they are a fraction of the cost, a heck of a lot more reliable, and don’t require a vent hood (depending on local codes). While the combi is often oversold, the CVap oven is a great value piece that has endless cooking opportunities.

Want to learn more about CVap equipment? Click here.

CVap Sous Vide Barbecue, Sort of!

Part 1

Chef Barry Removes Bagless Ribs from CVap Retherm Oven
As the weather heats up, many folks begin daydreaming about barbecue. May is National BBQ Month – an entire month focusing on the delicious ways we’ve discovered to make proteins their savory, smoky best.

Barbecue has been a frequent topic in our blogs, for a couple of reasons. First (obviously) is that barbecue is freakin’ delicious. But another huge reason is how perfect CVap® Staging technology is at bringing the lip-smacking best out of barbecued meats and veggies. I’m amazed (but not surprised) at just how many calls we get at Winston asking about how to prepare barbecue in CVap. (for a quick, quirky video about CVap® Staging and sous vide, click here).

CVap technology positively impacts your BBQ recipes in many ways. Cook amazingly tender briskets in a CVap Cook & Hold. Add a Winston Smoker Box to your CVap Holding Cabinet to smoke bodacious Boston butts in a CVap holding cabinet. You can even Sous-Vide-Que your ribs using the method outlined on the Amazing ribs website.

In our most recent BBQ test, we prepared baby back ribs using two different methods of “sous vide” – bagged and bagless, simultaneously in the same unit, our new CVap RTV5-05 Retherm Oven.

Raw Ingredients
Ingredients

Procedure

    1. Remove membrane from ribs and rinse.
    2. Rub mustard on all sides of the ribs.
    3. Liberally sprinkle Memphis Dust on all sides of ribs.
    4. Weigh each slab of ribs.
    1. Rubbed Ribs
    2. Smoke ribs in preheated CVap Holding Cabinet to 170°F food temp and 170°F air with smoker box set for two hours. In this case, we used hickory chips.
    1. Ribs Smoking in CVap Holding Cabinet
    2. Vacuum seal three slabs of ribs in vacuum sealer, using high temp bags.
    3. Allow ribs to rest in refrigerator for a minimum of six hours.
  1. Chef Barry reviews smoked ribs
  2. Preheat CVap RTV5-05UV to 190°F water temperature and 240°F air temperature.
  3. Place prepared ribs into oven and cook until ribs reach 203°F.
  4. Remove ribs and weigh for yield.
  5. If preferred, place on grill and crisp, then finish with another dusting of Memphis Dust.

Ribs prepared in bagless sous-vide

Weight In Weight Out Yield Time to End Point End Point
Vacuum Sealed 3.607 kg 3.207 kg 88% 2 hours, 23 mins 203.1°F
Bagless 3.087 kg 2.657 kg 86% 3 hours, 10 mins 201.7°F

Observations

  1. Ribs that were vacuum sealed in the traditional sous vide style cooked more quickly and had a slightly higher yield.
  2. Both ribs were highly acceptable relative to taste, tenderness, and juiciness.
  3. Ribs cooked in bag were slightly more tender; ribs cooked bagless were slightly more toothsome.
  4. Ribs cooked in bag had a less-defined outer bark, and more of a wet finish.
  5. Ribs cooked bagless in CVap had better bark and more defined rub taste.

Finished Ribs
Bagged ribs on left, bagless ribs on right.

Next Steps

  1. Duplicate Amazing Ribs Sous vide Que.

CVap Staging Download Button

National Taco Day? Bite Your Tongue!

October 4 is National Taco Day. If you’re like us, you don’t need an excuse to eat tacos and you’ll surely agree they’ve become an indelible delight devoured daily by millions worldwide.

Historically speaking, the origin of the taco predates the arrival of the Spanish in Mexico. There is anthropological evidence that the indigenous people living in the lake region of the Valley of Mexico traditionally ate tacos filled with small fish. Writing at the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Díaz del Castillo documented the first taco feast enjoyed by Europeans, a meal which Hernán Cortés arranged for his captains in Coyoacán.[5][6]  Source: Wikipedia    For more fun facts about tacos and what people love about them, click here: https://nationaltoday.com/national-taco-day/

There are so many varieties of tacos to count, it’s difficult to choose a favorite! So in honor of this special day of tribute to the taco, we thought we’d go uber-taqueria-traditional and share our CVap® preparation for Tacos de Lengua.

Beef tongue is exactly what it sounds like – the big ol’ tongue of a cow. Though not as commonly found on the average U.S. family’s dinner table, it’s widely used in Mexican cuisine, as well as several European, Asian, and South American cultures. It’s a great example of a fairly tough cut of meat that a CVap oven can cook beautifully. Using a low-and-slow method to prepare it in the CVap Cook & Hold breaks down the extensive connective tissue within the beef tongue, resulting in surprisingly tender, tasty meat.

whole beef tongues

Ingredients

  • 4 to 5 Beef tongues
  • 4 Cups beef broth
  • 2 Cans (7oz.) Chipotle in Adobo sauce
  • 2 Onions (sliced thin)
  • 8 Garlic cloves (roughly chopped)
  • 1 Tsp Salt
  • 1 Tsp Black pepper
  • 1 Tbsp Ground cumin
  • 1 Tbsp Mexican oregano

Cooking Procedure

  1. Rinse and wash tongues in cold water
  2. Place onions in the bottom of a 4” deep full-size hotel pan
  3. Place tongue on top of onions, top with beef stock and chipotles
  4. Add garlic and all of the seasonings
  5. Cover pan tightly with foil and place in a CVap Cook & Hold (preheated to 180 water vapor, 250 air temperature) and cook for 8 hours constant cook.
  6. Remove from oven and cool to room temp, then refrigerate for a minimum of four hours.
  7. After tongues have sufficiently cooled, remove the outer skin. Shred the remaining beef.
  8. Puree the chilies, onions and remaining broth to create a sauce. Toss a third of the sauce with the shredded beef. Refrigerate the beef and remaining sauce.

I recommend doing this a day in advance of preparing your tangy tongue tacos.

Ingredients for Lingua Tacos

Beef Tongue in Sauce
Cutting the Tongue
Skinning the Tounge
Shredding Tongue
Shredded Tongue

Assembling Lengua Tacos

Ingredients

  • Shredded tongue
  • Oil of your choosing for saute
  • Chipotle sauce
  • 2 Cups Cojita cheese
  • 1 Cup minced onion
  • 3 Cups Fresh Cilantro (roughly chopped)
  • Limes
  • Warm corn tortillas held in CVap cabinet at 140 water vapor, 142 air temp

Final Taco Ingredients

Procedure

  1. Preheat remaining chipotle sauce
  2. Using a little bit of the vegetable oil, saute lengua (tongue) until it is a little crisp on the tips and is heated through. This may be done on a flat top or a saute pan.
  3. Assemble tacos
  4. Add lengua to warm tortillas
  5. Top with a little sauce, then cojita, then onions, then fresh cilantro.
  6. Squeeze fresh lime juice over taco and enjoy!

Beef Tongue Taco

Lengua tacos are delicious, and lip smackin’ good!

 

Kentucky Lamb Hams – Not B-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-d!

Two big, salty hams.
One big salty ham poses next to another big, salty ham. The ham on the left is pork. The ham on the right is Chef Barry.

Ham. The very word brings to mind the many variations of the savory pork product. In the vast majority of cases, when folks say “ham,” they mean pork. Recently however I was talking with my friend Valerie Samutin about her lambs on Freedom Run Farm and she told me about the history of lamb ham in Kentucky. Apparently in colonial times, lamb was the protein of choice for the settlers in Kentucky. In order to preserve their lamb for winter consumption, they would cure hind quarters just like we do with pork.

I love to fuse historical traditions with new technologies. Our commonwealth was well-known as a core market for sheep and lamb production. Remnants of that heritage can still be found in central Kentucky, where dishes such as the mutton-based Burgoo remain very popular. I decided to use Freedom Run Farm’s wonderful lamb to test the hot smoking abilities of our new smoker box in a CVap holding cabinet. CVap Hot Smoked Lamb Ham!

lamb ham collage

Ingredients

  • 50g Prague powder (cure) No. 2
  • 80g KY Spice Berries (substitute fresh ground peppercorns if spice berries aren’t available)
  • 500g light brown sugar or turbinado sugar
  • 700g pure sea salt (iodine free)
  • 4-6kg fresh lamb leg, bone in and hoof on
  • Sugna:1kg olive oil mixed with flour to make a thick paste ***optional
  • (You need 80g cure for each 1kg of lamb leg) Approximately 300- 500 grams of cure per leg

Procedure

    1. Very Important! Weigh lamb leg and record weight! Record day and time of curing start as well and keep for your records!
    2. Make curing mixture with the first four ingredients above. Mix thoroughly.
    3. Rinse lamb leg thoroughly and pat dry with a paper towel. Then rub the lamb with the cure. Don’t worry about using too much. Rub firmly, pushing the leg bone with your thumbs. There is a main artery there that may not have been thoroughly bled. This process will help work out any remain blood. Once this is complete make sure you rub more cure around the aitch (hip) bone. This is the exposed bone/joint where the leg was severed from the lamb’s torso (VERY important step.)

raw legs and hams
raw hams
washed ham

    1. Place leg of lamb on a bed of salt in a nonreactive container, preferably plastic, or old school on a wooden rack. In this case I used nonreactive plastic seeding trays. Place lamb in a refrigerated environment for a minimum of ten days. Turn daily and make sure that cure is redistributed daily. If necessary add more cure. General rule of thumb for curing is one day per kilogram, but no less than ten days.

Salted hams
Fit to be tied
first salt
closeup salty
salty in cvap

    1. After the curing period is complete, rinse lamb and place in refrigerator for 24 hours. This allows for good pellicle formation. Pellicle is a skin or coating of proteins on the surface of meats that allows for smoke to adhere during the smoking process.
    2. After the 24 hour refrigeration, place lamb hams in a CVap holding cabinet at 165°F food temp and +5 on food texture. Place hickory chunks in Winston smoker box and set timer for three hours. Once cabinet is preheated, place lamb into CVap and hot smoke until internal temperature reaches 155°F. This takes approximately three hours. [Note: Although CVap equipment doesn’t usually require vent hoods, the addition of a smoker box will usually require utilization of a vent hood. Always check local codes.)
    3. After lamb reaches 155°F, remove from CVap cabinet, weigh, and record weight. At this time, some folks like to add a Sugna (a mixture of fat and flour) on the cut surface of the ham. This is classically done with prosciutto, iberico, or Appalachian mountain hams to keep the cut surface from excessively drying. In this case, I don’t believe that it is necessary, as lamb takes less time to cure and reach maturity than a traditional leg of pork. Keep in a refrigerated environment until the lamb leg has lost 25-30 % of its original weight. Once this weight loss has been achieved, your lamb ham should be ready.

strung up smoked hams

  1. Lamb preserved this way should be shelf stable for up to six months. There is no need to age longer, because hot smoking kills the enzymes that would generate any further flavor complexities. Once the ham has been cut, wrap cut surface with plastic wrap and refrigerate. Another option is to bone the ham and vacuum seal individual piece that can be cut later.

smoked ham lambs
ham in hand
Bob Perry carving lamb ham.

In this case we sampled to a lot of chef friends, and also shared with Bob Perry at his 3rd annual Kentucky Neurogastronomy Symposium held at the University of Kentucky.

The Flavor of the Emerald Isle is Easy as Pie!

Once again, we find ourselves celebrating St. Patrick’s Day. Here in the Ohio Valley, most of us have at least a smidgen of Irish blood flowing through our veins. But on March 17, we all tend to be sons (or daughters) of Erin.

One of the classic recipes in Irish cuisine is Shepherd’s Pie. The origins of this simple comfort food are unclear, though by most accounts it originated on Great Britain, as a simple dish to utilize leftover meats (the term Shepherd’s Pie seems to have come from Northern England and Scotland, where there are large numbers of sheep). What’s the difference between Shepherd’s Pie and Cottage Pie? The type of meat. Shepherd’s pie is typically made with lamb. Cottage pie is typically made with beef.

Although recipes similar to Shepherd’s pie have existed for centuries, it wasn’t until potatoes became a common staple in the 1700s that the dish took on its current form. Prior to that, most recipes utilized a pastry crust, rather than potatoes.

Although this recipe is a simple, basic dish to prepare, having CVap® equipment at my disposal made it so much easier. And the results were delicious!

Plated Shepherd's Pie

Shepherd’s Pie

Mashed Potatoes

  • 6 large potatoes
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • ½ cup Parmesan
  • 1 egg yolk

Filling

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 medium onion, diced small
  • 1 cup diced carrots
  • 3/4 cup green peas
  • 3/4 cup corn
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 8 oz beef stock
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon pepper
  • 1.5 lbs ground lamb

Bake potatoes in a CVap RTV Retherm Oven At 200 air / 250 vapor (legacy setting 200 +50) for 35 minutes.

Prepare cream and butter mixture for mashed potatoes.

Sauté onions until translucent, then add garlic and carrots. Simmer until carrots begin to soften, then add ground lamb. Stir occasionally, until lamb is completely browned. Add peas and corn. Season with salt & pepper.

Mashed potatoes – add cream butter mixture to cooked potatoes and mash, add salt & pepper, once completely mashed, stir in egg yolk.

Move cooked veggie-lamb mixture to dish, and dollop mashed potatoes throughout, then spread potatoes over the top of lamb and vegetables.

Bake for 30-35 min in CVap Retherm Oven at 180 Vapor, 330 Air(189 + 150 for legacy CVap Retherm Ovens).

Potatoes party


The results were satisfying and delicious; simple, savory flavors that were just the thing to warm a chilly March afternoon.

There are countless variations of this basic recipe. Shepherdess Pie is vegetarian (or {blech} vegan). Cumberland pie adds a breadcrumb or pastry crust. Some recipe call for turkey or ham as the protein. The possibilities are limited only by your imagination.

To make it a proper St. Patrick’s Day celebration, I suggest a Bordeaux, a complex wine that goes great with a dish like shepherd’s pie. Its earthy and savory flavors will match well. Pinot noir is another great pairing. It’s bright and easy to drink, and will match up well with the sweet vegetables in this dish.

If you are like me, and are more a beer person, a nice dry Irish stout should pair really well!

CVap Pineapple Chinese Five-Spice Pork Riblets

Pineapple Chinese 5-Spice Riblets

Happy New Year! 新年快乐 (xīn nián kuài lè)

The Year of the Dog is nearly upon us. Though commonly thought of as Chinese New Year here in the US, it’s a holiday celebrated by much of the Asian world, and nearly a fifth of the planet’s population.

Like any good holiday, an important part of the it is sharing good food with family and friends. In that spirit, we’d like to pass along this recipe to you. It’s an amazing rib recipe shared with us by Chef Chas Tatigian of Twin Eagles Golf and Country Club. Chef Tatigian created this recipe specifically to showcase one of his CVap techniques, and this one – involving a slow braise under vacuum seal – is a real winner!

If you like what you see, let us know and tell us how you CVap!

RUB FOR THE RIBS (enough for approximately 4-5 Danish racks)

  • 1/2 Part Ground Coriander
  • 1 Part Allspice
  • 1 Part Chinese 5 Spice
  • 4 Parts Brown Sugar
  • Cayenne to taste

BASE COOKING MARINADE

  • 1 Cup Soy Sauce
  • 1 ½ Cups Teriyaki Sauce
  • 1/3 Cup Bacon Fat
  • 3/4 Cup Pineapple Juice
  • 1 ¼ Sugar
  • 1/4 Cup Honey
  • 1 Roughly Chopped Scallion
  • 1 Tbsp Chopped Garlic

DIRECTIONS:

  • Liberally rub ribs and let stand at room temperature for 30-40 minutes.
  • Char ribs on hot grill and refrigerate.
  • When cooled, slice ribs into pieces leaving a little meat on both sides of the rib bone and bring to room temperature.
  • Combine ingredients for cooking marinade (this is enough for 4-5 Danish racks).
  • Heat the cooking marinade to approximately 100° to melt sugar and fat.
  • Place room temp ribs in a vacuum bag and put enough warm marinade in to cover ribs.
  • Seal bag at 90% to 95% vacuum.
  • Cook ribs in CVap Cook & Hold oven at 135/0 for 32 hours.
  • Cool bags in ice bath to use at later date OR, to use immediately, remove liquid and flash-roast bare ribs at 400°F until a little crisp, garnish with diced grilled pineapple and green onions, cut on a long bias.

Chef Tatigian is a long-time member of the CVap Nation. But don’t just take our word for it. Take his.

Chinese short ribs

Preparing for Pickling Perfection in a CVap

empty pickle jars
In my heyday of contemporary cooking (call it what you will, Farm to Table, Conscious Cuisine, Haute Cuisine, whatever), preservation was (and had always been) a major trend. Preservation – in the forms of pickling, fermenting, smoking, curing etc. – are all ways to preserve the season you are working with. This allows chefs to provide the best products and extend the seasons.

How does this relate to CVap? If you have ever done any at-home vegetable canning, you know how difficult it can be. It is equally difficult to manage all those jars and lids in a restaurant kitchen. So I removed the conventional boiling of jars from the equation and used CVap technology instead. Removing boiling water from the process makes canning much safer and easier.

pickling jars in CVap
Many factors are involved when canning items; acidity, altitude, head space, etc., to name a few. Because these variable factors can cause a canning process to go wrong, I will avoid providing a recipe. However, I will list the steps that I used to pickle vegetables and preserve clementines in CVap.

  • In the Cook & Hold Oven, I set the unit to 200 Food Temperature and 4 Food Texture. This gave me an overall temperature of 230°F. By doing so, I am able to ensure that all the bacteria are eliminated and the jars sanitized, and eliminating the processing step.
  • I brought my CVap up to temp and loaded all the jars, open, facing up into the unit. In that same pan, I placed all the lids and bands.
  • While the sanitation process was working, I prepared my pickling liquid and vegetables separately.
  • prepped veggies for pickling

  • When I was finished with the vegetables and liquid I was able to remove the jars from the CVap and fill each.
  • When dealing with potentially hazardous foods, it is essential to keep the jars sanitized until they are ready to fill. By leaving them in the CVap, I was able to ensure the jars remained safely sanitized.
  • Sealed pickle jars

  • After they were filled, I placed the lids and bands on each jar (finger tight) and loaded them back into the CVap for the processing step. This last step is crucial to the canning process, enabling a tight seal.
  • When they came out, I left them to cool at room temperature for 24 hours. The lids did not bubble and a week later I got to pop open a jar and enjoy the vegetables I pickled.

What’s So Great About CVap? Let These Folks Tell You

Chad, Roxanne, and Susan
Winston’s Chad Lunsford is all smiles with WBL Area School’s Roxanne Knops and Susan Grun.

One of the things we love about exhibiting at the School Nutrition Association’s Annual National Conference is having the opportunity to talk one-on-one with the folks who use our equipment every day. Here are some unscripted comments these great folks offered during 2017’s conference in Atlanta, Georgia.

SNA ANC2017 Video Playlist

Celebrating National Hispanic History Month with CVap-style Tamales!

September 15 marks the beginning of National Hispanic History Month. This 30-day observation celebrates the histories, cultures, and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. Enjoying the flavors and culinary influences of this diverse group is a great way to celebrate. This CVap-style tamale recipe, made with slow-cooked pork butt, is a fantastic example of Hispanic cuisine.

Recipe: Pork Tamales, CVap Style

Ingredients

  • Pork Butt, 7 to 14 lb Whole
  • Tex-Mex Dry Rub of your choice (we used Chef Barry Yates’ secret blend)
  • Tamale Sauce of your choice
  • Masa, cooked per label instructions
  • Corn Husks

Preparation

Prepare masa and set aside.

Soak corn husks in warm water, set aside.

Apply a layer of dry rub to pork butts as desired.
Preheat a CVap Cook & Hold Oven to 180 + 7 with Constant Cook OFF (high yield). Cook with fat cap up for 7:00 hours.

Hold for a minimum of 6 hours at 150 + 0. (We held for 14 hrs.)

Allow pork to cool and then shred it.

Mix enough tamale sauce into the pork to wet it. You may add additional seasoning (cumin, red pepper) as desired.

Lay out a corn husk, apply a generous spoonful of masa and a spoonful of pork.

Fold the corn husk to envelope the mixture.

Place in pan. You can stack the tamales.

Pour tamale sauce over the top and bake.

Serve immediately with additional tamale sauce and enjoy with a cool beverage!

How are you celebrating Hispanic History Month? Share with us on Facebook or Twitter! To learn more about CVap equipment, visit our website winstonfoodservice.com

 

Get Your Poultry Sales Poppin’ with CVap® Wings!

Get more covers in less time with CVap® Staging – Sous Vide Re-Engineered.

What goes better with warm weather gatherings than chicken wings? There are so many ways to flavor and cook this delicious treat, but when frying them, it feels like it takes forever.

We know that our our CVap Cook & Hold Oven is the workhorse in the kitchen, so we decided to put it to use so we could reduce fry time.

We took raw, fresh, jumbo bone-in chicken wings and advance staged them in the CVap Cook & Hold at 165 + 0 (or 165°F vapor/166°F air in New CVap) until they reached an internal temperature of 160°F. When we dropped them in the Collectramatic® fryer (open fry at 350°F), they were ready to serve in four minutes flat. The chicken was crispy on the outside, moist and juicy on the inside, and it exceeded a finishing temp of 165°F.

The CVap® Staging really came through on these chicken wings! These are easy to prepare for catering, appetizer specials, or any time you just want a batch. You’ll be able to serve them up in minutes, with each batch hot, fresh, and delicious.

CVap Staging Download Button

Learn more about CVap Cook & Holds and Collectramatic Fryers.

Exploration of Eggs: CVap Crème Brûlée

Creamy, velvety, decadent, smooth…there are so many delicious words to describe custards! But anyone who works with eggs or custards knows they are delicate and require precision handling. Even with the right skill set, it can be hard to get the same results every time with the limitations of traditional equipment. Not anymore! I have a few recipes that will give you perfect results, time after time. The way CVap treats a custard is just awesome.

Today I’m sharing my favorite Crème Brûlée recipe; one is prepared in a CVap Cook/Hold Oven and the other in a CVap Thermalizer Oven – ENJOY! I’ll post my favorite cheesecake recipe soon, so be sure to check back. If you have a favorite custard recipe that you’d like for us to try in a CVap, please share it.

Crème Brûlée Baked in a CVap Cook/Hold Oven

Recipe/Process:

  1. Preset Cook/Hold to 200 + 0 and allow approximately 30 minutes to preheat.
  2. Set timer to 45 minutes.
  3. Beat 6 egg yolks, 4 tablespoons sugar, and ½ tsp of vanilla extract in a mixing bowl until thick and creamy.
  4. Pour 2 ½ cups of heavy cream into a saucepan and stir over low heat until it almost comes to a boil. Remove the cream from heat immediately. Stir cream into the egg yolk mixture; beat until combined.
  5. Pour into a shallow, heat-proof ramekin.
  6. Place in Cook/Hold and press start. After time is up, remove from oven and cool to room temperature. Refrigerate for 1 hour or overnight.
  7. When ready to serve, sprinkle sugar on top of the custard, and caramelize with a chef’s torch.

Crème Brûlée Baked in a CVap Thermalizer

Recipe/Process:

  1. Preset Thermalizer channel 1, place a full sheet pan on the top rack and allow approximately 30 minutes to preheat.
  2. Set timer to 30 minutes.
  3. Beat 6 egg yolks, 4 tablespoons sugar and ½ tsp of vanilla extract in a mixing bowl until thick and creamy.
  4. Pour 2 ½ cups of heavy cream into a saucepan and stir over low heat until it almost comes to a boil. Remove the cream from heat immediately. Stir cream into the egg yolk mixture; beat until combined.
  5. Pour into a shallow, heat-proof ramekin.
  6. Place in Thermalizer and press start. After time is up, remove from oven and cool to room temperature. Refrigerate for 1 hour or overnight.
  7. When ready to serve, sprinkle sugar on top of the custard, and caramelize with a chef’s torch.

There are 100 ways to cook an egg, and whether they are center of the plate or part of a cake or custard, there are so many ways to serve them.

Burger Season is Upon Us. Prepare to Gobble!

Memorial Day is upon us. It’s a time to reflect on the sacrifices of our men and women in uniform. It’s also the official start of the summer season. Think summer foods, and the first thing that comes to mind is burgers. Here’s a delicious twist on burgers – made better with CVap (of course).

Not only does Memorial Day begin summer, it also immediately precedes June – a.k.a. National Turkey Lovers’ Month. So what does that mean? That’s right – turkey burgers! But not just any turkey burgers – these burgers started with CVap Staging.

First a question: do any of you get frustrated when someone describes turkey burgers as being dry, flavorless, or dull? With the abundance of techniques we have at our disposal, and the enormous variety of flavor combinations to choose from, there’s just no excuse for it! And of course we love turkey as a starring protein because it is a lean, versatile option.

For this post, we experimented with two different approaches, though our base mixture was the same for both. We combined ½ lb. of ground turkey with two beaten eggs, ¼ cup of Bourbon Barrel Soy Sauce, ½ of an onion (minced), One minced garlic clove, and one cup of Panko bread crumbs. Once the mixture was gently combined, we formed 3-ounce patties and put some on a parchment-lined half-size sheet pan.

turkey burger ingredients - mise en place
Eggs, minced garlic and onion, Panko, and soy sauce.

 

ground turkey raw
Ground turkey. Gently knead other ingredients into meat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

patties on tray
Ground turkey mixture formed into 3-oz. patties. Half were placed on parchment-lined tray.

 

smoke into bag
The other half of the patties were vacuum-sealed with a little added smoke.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We took the other half, placed them in pouches for vacuum-sealing, and then added a little smoke for an extra dimension of flavor. It was just enough to give the burgers a subtle smokiness without it being overwhelming.

All of the patties then went into a CVap Cook/Hold Oven with Constant Cook ON, a Food Temperature (Doneness) setting of 145°F and a Food Texture (Browning) setting of 0, for 30 minutes.

 

 

 

To finish the patties, we pan seared them for texture and brought them to a finished temperature of 150° to 155°F (though tossing them on a grill for quick finish would work equally well). CVap Staging and then finishing in this manner yielded extremely well-textured, moist, and flavorful burgers.

The patties that were vacuum-sealed wound up being the perfect size and shape for the toasted ciabatta rolls we were using. We dressed those simply, with fresh torn cilantro and a chipotle salsa (fresh pico mixed with pureed chipotle peppers) that complimented the slight hint of smoke in the patty.

Pouched patties, seared on a grill
Pouched turkey patty, finished by searing on grill.

Turkey burgers with fresh torn cilantro and chipotle salsa.
Patties CVapped in a pouch fit perfectly on ciabatta buns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After pan-searing the more traditional patties, we treated a ciabatta bun to Sriracha mayonnaise on one side and an explosively delicious mixture of pureed onion, Bourbon Barrel Soy Sauce, and minced ginger and garlic on the other side. We finished it off with a mixture of tender baby lettuce and torn, fresh cilantro.

asian dressed turkey burger
Asian-influenced traditional patty with Sriracha mayo, onion, soy sauce, minced ginger and garlic, baby lettuce and torn cilantro.

Asian-styled turkey burger
Traditional patty dressed with Asian flavors. Note the even doneness – a hallmark of CVap cooking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While the first, Latin-inspired burger was extremely tasty, the Asian-influenced burger was off-the-charts delicious. We can’t wait to make it again!

So what exactly is CVap Staging? Using this process, food is brought to the exact internal temperature desired and then held there – without overcooking or drying out – until it is time to finish and serve the dish. This means that the final flavor-enhancing and texturing touches can be made just moments before the food is served. Imagine how much faster you could push plates out of a kitchen!

For more information about the complete line of CVap products, please visit our website at winstonfoodservice.com .

Celebrate Cinco de Mayo and Derby Day with Carnitas!

I love food! And I mean all types of food. My absolute favorite style of cuisine is Hispanic – more specifically, Mexican, with its wealth of tradition and depth of flavors. What’s not to like? This year Cinco de Mayo and the Kentucky Derby fall back-t0-back on May 5 and 6. Celebrate both with a delicious Mexican recipe.

I have a group of friends I meet every Sunday at our local South of the Border establishment for lunch and a margarita or three (If I’m being honest, the food is decent, but the margaritas are the real draw!). I decided to mix it up and order one of my favorite traditional Mexican dishes: carnitas. They were less than spectacular, and I asked my friend Sergio why he thought they weren’t very good. He replied that too many people really only want fajitas on the hot plate, and this restaurant’s preparation just wasn’t traditional. To be fair, one look around the room proved that he was right. It looked like a sauna with the steam rising from every table. I was a victim of demand.

I wasn’t about to settle for this disappointment, however. Carnitas are a staple of Mexican cuisine and I mean, c’mon, it’s pork! I decided to take matters into my own hands. There are many ways to prepare carnitas, but traditionally it is shoulder meat (or leftover parts of a butchered hog) slow braised for several hours in pork lard confit style. Once the pork has been broken down enough, it is taken out and either pulled apart or cut into cubes. It then goes back into the lard with the heat turned up, and is fried to add texture. There are many twists and variations of this dish, and the part of the country you are in usually defines what ingredients and flavors your carnitas might have. For this recipe, I’m combining the old with the new and adding a splash of CVap®.

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. pork shoulder, cut into 1″ cubes
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon cumin
  • ½ teaspoon oregano
  • 2 small bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • ½ orange
  • ½ lime
  • ½ medium onion
  • ½ Mexican beer, preferably dark
  • Fresh cilantro
  • 2 lbs. lard or cooking oil

Instructions

In a large vacuum or re-sealable bag, combine all ingredients.

carnitas ingredients
Carnitas ingredients.

 

carnitas ingredients in bag

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place bag in CVap Cook/Hold oven at the settings below. Drink the other half of your Mexican beer!

CVap Cook/Hold settings

High Yield Mode:  OFF

Doneness:  178

Browning:  0

Time:  8 hours

When the timer goes off, pull the bag out of the CVap oven and separate the pork cubes from the other ingredients.

cooked cubed pork
Cooked cubed pork

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heat lard or oil in a fryer or large pot on the stove to 350°F (or medium-high heat). Carefully drop the cubes into the oil and let fry until golden brown, about one minute.

carnitas fryer
Ready for the fryer.

frying carnitas
Frying the cubed pork

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now comes the tricky part: eat the carnitas! I usually enjoy them over a bed of rice and beans, with a little salsa on top. I also like them in a corn tortilla with diced onions, cilantro, and freshly squeezed lime. Then again, sometimes I just eat them right out of the pot because it’s fried pork and I’m impatient. There is no right or wrong here, just enjoy!

fried pork pieces

 

Who Doesn’t Love Cupcakes?!

Yum! Yum! Walking down the street and peering into the local cupcake shop, I often wonder, is that a sweet treat or a piece of edible art work? Mouthwatering cupcake shops have popped in every major city and in many small towns. If you want to use your CVap Cook/Hold or Thermalizer to rival the cupcake shops, we can show you how!

CUPCAKES
Just take your favorite cake recipe and set the Cook/Hold or Thermalizer to the below settings. CVap makes a moist and light cake that will be a hit for any occasion.

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With endless variations and recipes for cake, use your favorite recipe. Or if you need a quick and easy cupcake, here is a modified box recipe that I personally love to use:

Take your favorite standard size box mix and use 4 eggs, ¾ cup oil, 1 tsp vanilla, 1 cup sour cream and ¾ cup sugar. Mix and bake.

Cook/Hold settings:
Constant cook ON
Food Temperature 165
Browning 10
Bake at the recommended time listed for your specific cake recipe.

Thermalizer Settings:
Channel #4
Cook for recommended time and check mid-way through cook cycle

ICING
As for icing, buttercream is my favorite. Italian buttercream is made by cooking sugar and only using real butter. Cooking the sugar gives it a smooth texture and the butter gives it a rich flavor. Below is my recipe 🙂

Buttercream Icing Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 4 egg whites (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, cubed and softened at room temperature
  • Pinch of salt, optional

*Makes buttercream for 12 cupcakes.

Buttercream Procedure:

  1. 000_2762Combine sugar and water in a medium-sized saucepan. Heat over low heat, stirring with a metal spoon, until the sugar has dissolved and the syrup is clear. Increase heat to medium-high and allow syrup to come to a boil.
  2. Meanwhile, place egg whites in a stand mixer fitted with a whisk, or in a medium bowl if using a handheld mixer, and beat until whites are almost able to hold soft peaks.
  3. Cook syrup until it reaches 235°F, then immediately remove from heat and slowly drizzle the hot syrup into the bowl with the egg whites, mixing continuously to prevent the eggs from scrambling: don’t pour the syrup onto the whisk, or the syrup may splatter against the sides of the bowl; instead, aim for a spot close to the whisk.
  4. Once all the syrup has been added, keep mixing until the bottom of the bowl feels cool to the touch and the meringue has cooled down to body temperature.
  5. Add butter one cube at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla and salt. The mixture may start to look as if it’s separating, but don’t panic: just keep mixing and whipping until the buttercream comes together and becomes smooth and gorgeous.
  6. Use immediately or refrigerate in an airtight container or a zipper-lock bag in the fridge for up to two weeks or in the freezer for up to two months. To use buttercream that has either been refrigerated or frozen, first allow to come to room temperature then beat until smooth and spreadable again. Cakes or cupcakes decorated with buttercream generally keep up to 3 days, stored in an airtight container in the fridge. Serve buttercream at room temperature.000_2767

Winston Smoker Box

Winston Smoker Box

Convert your CVap® into the smoker of your dreams! The smoker box allows for up to six hours of continuous smoking to create tender meats with that smoky flavor your customers love. Smoke without the expense and footprint of another piece of equipment! With easy installation onto the CVap Cook & Hold or Retherm Oven, this Winston accessory is a must-have.

 

Purchase yours here:

PS3145 Winston Smoker Box

Winston Smoker Box PS3145

TURDUCKEN!

Thanksgiving may be the time for tradition, but for us we decided it was time to shake things up! This year, we not only roasted and fried turkeys, but we also cooked the infamous turducken. In case you aren’t familiar, that is a turkey, duck, and chicken all rolled into one. Sound too good to be true? Honestly, we thought so too!

Let us warn you, this isn’t a task you take on unless you are fully committed. Time and patience are your friends during the time you are preparing the most delicious turducken.

Process

1. Debone all meat – turkey, chicken, and duck. We did this the day before to save some time on the day of. Depending on your expertise, this should take about 45 minutes to an hour and a half.

2. Make stuffing to place in-between each layer of meat. This is the list of ingredients we used, but feel free to put your own spin on this favorite. We also made a double batch for each turkey to ensure we had enough for each layer.

  • Stuffing mix of your choice, we used corn bread
  • Celery
  • Onion
  • Chicken Broth (or Vegetable broth)
  • Fresh Parsley
  • Fresh Sage
  • Minced Garlic
  • Paprika
  • Pepper
  • Salt

Now for the turducken!

  • Season each piece of meat with salt and pepper
  • Lay turkey out ready for the stuffing
  • First layer of stuffing on turkey
  • Chicken thighs placed on top of turkey, and chicken breast on lower half of turkeyimg_0224
  • Second layer of stuffingimg_0226
  • Duck placed in middle of stuffing layer
  • Last layer of stuffingimg_0228
  • Begin to pull up sides of turkey to secure everything inside with twine or skewers

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  • Season outside of turkey – we used paprika, salt, and pepper

CVap Settings

The other turkey was cooked on high yield at 170 doneness and 4 level browning for 6 hours then held overnight for 8 hours at 150 doneness and 1 level browning.

One turkey was staged at 165 and 0 browning over night for 14 hours and then finished in the Collectramatic fryer for 3 minutes.

Roasted turkey – 82% yield

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Staged & fried turkey – 84% yield

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